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Monthly Archives: October 2014

Creativity: The True Art of Being Immortal

Blais Pascal

Blais Pascal

Being a fan of Sci-Fi, I can tell that one of the pre-occupations of mankind is learning how to live forever. Shallow as that may sound, it’s an unconscious desire of every human, including YOU.

Well, I learnt the secret of living forever in the most unlikely places-rap music.50 Cent, in the euphoria of releasing his first album raps, “When I die, they’ll read this and say a genius wrote it”. Ludacris in the first song off his album, Chicken n Beer, raps, “Through this music, I’ll still be heard if I’m dead”.

Three years ago, I came across a booklet in my house, it was a christian booklet written by Blaise Pascal. Till that moment, I had not known Blaise Pascal to be a writer, even a writer of christian books. I only knew him as a 17th Century Mathematician, not as a deep-faithed christian. That book was titled, Pensées (I read and write French) but its contents were published in English. I could deduce that it was a book that carried Pascal’s deepest thoughts. It’s one of the most astounding arguments for belief in the christian faith that I’ve ever read, but it was written prosaically like a literary work and I later learned that it is hailed as “the most eloquent book in French prose.”

In Pensées, Pascal surveys
several philosophical paradoxes: infinity
and nothing, faith and reason, soul and
matter, death and life, meaning and vanity—seemingly arriving at no definitive conclusions besides humility, ignorance, and grace.

What if Blaise Pascal had decided not to write his thoughts, for he died at the young age of 39.

Pascal’s work in Mathematics was already so precocious that famed philosopher and mathematician Rene Descartes was convinced that Pascal’s
father had written it. Descartes dismissed it with a sniff: “I do not find it
strange that he has offered demonstrations about conics more
appropriate than those of the ancients,”
adding, “but other matters related to this subject can be proposed that would scarcely occur to a 16 year old child.”

In 1642, in an effort to ease his father’s
endless, exhausting calculations, and
recalculations, of taxes owed and paid, Pascal, not yet 19, constructed a
mechanical calculator capable of addition
and subtraction, called Pascal’s calculator. 400 years later, these machines are widely regarded as the first computers and are the pioneers of computer engineering.

Today, there are limited copies of Blaise Pascal’s writing, especially the book, Pensees. It is mostly published with the original title Apologie de la religion Chrétienne (“Defense of the Christian Religion”) but I’m sure the book will never be phased out. It was Blaise Pascal’s last writing and an immortal sign of his creative genius as a writer.

He died, his last words being “May God never abandon me,” and was buried in the cemetery of Saint-Étienne-du-Mont.

Unleashing your creative side makes you immortal.

Check this blog for new posts by Tito Tobi on Wednesdays or Saturdays. His books are available on http://www.smashwords.com

 
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Posted by on 31/10/2014 in Biographies

 

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Sights of Sub-Saharan Africa’s Largest University: Selective Justice of ABU Sculpture Garden

Selective Justice

Selective Justice

This is a concrete moulded sculpture made by a student of Industrial Design department. It’s a dominant figure at the heart of ABU’s sculpture garden. The sculpture garden is a large expanse of land, filled with paintings and sculptures. It’s various sculptures amuse individuals as admirable works of art and imagination but also visible to the more critically minded are the marks of Nigeria’s socio-political landscape as imagined in the sculptors’ minds. This particular sculpture is called Selective Justice.

Selective Justice

Selective Justice

Check this blog for new posts by Tito Tobi on Wednesdays or Saturdays. His books are available on http://www.smashwords.com

 
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Posted by on 15/10/2014 in Uncategorized

 

Sights of Sub-Saharan Africa’s Largest University: ABU Senate

ABU Senate Building

ABU Senate Building

This picture shows the Ahmadu Bello University Senate building. The tallest building in the University environment. It houses the Vice-Chancellor’s office at the 7th Floor, the Information and Communications Technology Unit in the 3rd Floor and a host of other notable offices involved in the general running of the University.

Check this blog for new posts by Tito Tobi on Wednesdays or Saturdays. His books are available on http://www.smashwords.com

 
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Posted by on 15/10/2014 in Uncategorized

 

Sights of Sub-Saharan Africa’s Largest University: ABU Tower

This structure is arguably the most popular landmark and icon of Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria in Northern Nigeria. Popular misconceptions outside the University states that it houses the Information Communications Technology unit of the school but truth is that many within the school knows it doesn’t and many more don’t know exactly what lies within the tower.
But none can deny that it holds a spectacular aura that fuels this myth because of it’s location at the centre of the University.

Check this blog for new posts by Tito Tobi on Wednesdays or Saturdays. His books are available on http://www.smashwords.com

 
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Posted by on 10/10/2014 in Biographies

 

Sights of Sub-Saharan Africa’s Largest University: ABU Fountain

ABU Fountain

ABU Fountain

The ABU fountain is the first beautiful edifice you encounter after the gate. It sits at the largest road intersection within the University. It’s colourful lighting of red, green and blue lights creates a scenic wonder for every first timer who visits after dusk.

Check this blog for new posts by Tito Tobi on Wednesdays or Saturdays. His books are available on http://www.smashwords.com

 
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Posted by on 10/10/2014 in Uncategorized

 

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Time to Love Again

The nights we wake
With thoughts of pain
That never seems to abate
With our flowing tears

Wondering if rended hearts
Could be mended on earth.
A whisper of wind by the windowsill
A tink-a-tonk on the door’s keeol.

It’s love again, you know it
Should you let him in
It’s him that let your demons out
Should your heart warm him in.

His voice is softer; the knock, subtler
The time is not right.
It’s dark and you still cry;
And your thoughts are farther
The times are just not right

The knock thins, your heart skips
The whisper’s still, your heart skips
He knows the feel, he feels it too
But he knows the time’s not right too

Will the time ever get right
To love another again
Will you ever get the strength
That comes from being loved again

You’ll know
When the time’s right
You’ll know
That love isn’t time-bound.

Check this blog for new posts by Tito Tobi on Wednesdays or Saturdays. His books are available on http://www.smashwords.com

 
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Posted by on 01/10/2014 in Poems

 
 
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